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Youth
 
UK Couple's Babies to Stay
 
ONLINE:  TUESDAY JANUARY 25, 4:10 PM EST (GMT-5).

Previous News
UK Gay Couple's Twin Babies Refused Entry Upon Return from US
THE British Home Office today granted indefinite leave to stay to the surrogate twin babies of a male couple, according to the BBC.  The babies, born in the US, had been denied official admission to the UK upon their arrival at Heathrow Airport just before New Year's.

Aspen and Saffron were conceived using donor eggs, the sperm of one of the men, and a surrogate mother in the States.  The couple won a landmark legal victory in the Fall in California which allowed them to be listed on the babies' US birth certificates as "Parent One" and "Parent Two."

The couple, Tony Barlow, 35, and Barrie Drewitt, 30, of the UK will not, however, be considered the babies' legal parents in Britain.  Although the sperm of one of them was used in the conception - yet undisclosed - British law considers the parents to be the surrogate mother and her husband in California.

The babies have been denied UK citizenship.

The Home Office reportedly said the decision had been made outside normal immigration rules and had taken into account the exceptional circumstances of the case and the welfare needs of the children.  It further stated that if the children were to live abroad for several years their cases would have to be re-examined.

The case may not be over, however:  legal speculation has been that the European Convention of Human Rights, due to be incorporated into British law in October, would force the British government to grant the babies citizenship due to their right to see their parents and have a family life with them.  This argument would seemingly hinge on who the legal parents are, though.

The couple, who have been quoted as saying they'll take their case to the European Court of Human Rights if not resolved to their satisfaction, have yet to comment on today's announcement.